Browse Items (21 total)

  • Tags: Kansas

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This study of Ludell, Kansas and the lack of name continuity in Rawlins County includes a map analysis, a printed memoir-history by a resident, photographs of the town site, and an author’s firsthand accounts of interviews conducted with those who…

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This study illustrates the lost town of America City in Nemaha County, Kansas, from its hopeful founding to its imminent decline. Originally built at what would become the southern edge of the county, America City’s history exhibits an almost perfect…

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Drawing from Timothy F. Wenzl’s work “A Quasquicentennial History of St. Francis Xavier Parish: Seward, Kansas,” various documents located at the Stafford County Museum, and interviews with proud Seward, Kansas (and area) residents, this document…

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This study of persistence factors on an Indian reservation in Northeast Kansas includes interviews from Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribal Council member Carrie L. O’Toole (Wabaunsee), Prairie Band tribal member Laveda L.T. Wahweotten, and Dr. Eric…

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The town of Bloomington, Kansas, started out as Tilden in 1870 and received its name change three years later. At its peak, around 1930, Bloomington had seventy-five residents and boasted a bank, grocery store, telephone company, restaurant,…

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Originally called Divide, the town of Colony began as a tavern and later a depot on the Leavenworth, Lawrence, and Galveston railroad. In the early twentieth century, it was known as the "Hay Capital of the World."

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Diamond Springs first began as a supply point on the Santa Fe Trail, but proslavery forces destroyed it in 1863. After the Civil War, settlers from Illinois founded a new Diamond Springs about three miles south of the original site.

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Today at what used to be the center of the town of Dillon are three houses and the Dillon Elevator. This is what is left of the town of Dillon, which once had a population of over 1,000.

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Hiattville was once a booming town, its population increasing from 50 to 500 in the 1880s. Many residents left after a 1905 fire, and the post office finally closed in 1986.

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Navarre was organized around the school, the church, and starting in 1887, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe railroad. Fire destroyed much of the town in 1939, and it never recovered.
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